History of the Diamond Engagement Ring

A diamond ring has become the ultimate expression of a promise – a universally recognized symbol of unbreakable love.

The word diamond stems from the ancient Greek word ‘adámas’, which means ‘unbreakable’. This beautiful gemstone is one of the hardest natural materials known to man, resistant to fire and stronger than steel – so it is fitting that diamond rings have become synonymous with everlasting love and commitment.

A ring made of silver, and later of gold, has been a symbol of betrothal since Roman times, and possibly even as far back as Egyptian times. But it was not until 1477 that the gifting of a diamond ring to seal an engagement was first recorded. When Archduke Maximilian of Austria gave a diamond ring to Mary of Burgundy, he established a tradition that would define enduring love for hundreds of years to come.

Diamond engagement rings gained in popularity in the 19th century, a time of great wealth, when diamonds became more widely available. New cutting and polishing techniques allowed diamonds to sparkle with a fresh brilliance in solitaire engagement rings. In the 20th century, the tradition became firmly established. By the 1940s, diamond engagement rings had become the most popular line of jewelry in department stores; by 1965, 80 percent of American women had one.

It is a tradition that endures today, with couples around the world choosing to celebrate their promise to each other with a diamond engagement ring. And with new innovations, including Forevermark’s signature setting, which is designed to show off the full beauty of the unbreakable diamond at its heart, it is a tradition that shines brighter than ever.

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Did you know that Marisa Perry Atelier is now an exclusive site holder for Forevermark diamonds? All of our diamond jewelry can now be set with stones bearing the Forevermark promise. Click here to read more about the Forevermark Promise: The Promise

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* this article was sourced from the Forevermark website

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